Part 1: start with research, business and user goals

A table with icons for popular apps in each row, and column headers that read: Business Goal, Mission, Problem, Unique Value Proposition, Users, Competitors, and Industry
A table with icons for popular apps in each row, and column headers that read: Business Goal, Mission, Problem, Unique Value Proposition, Users, Competitors, and Industry

App critiques are a great way to showcase your design knowledge, critical thinking skills, and collaboration style. However, they can also be intimidating, opaque and tough to prepare for. After all, so many factors are out of your control! Which app will your interviewer pick? What questions will they ask? Where might the conversation lead?

The starting point for any successful app critique is intentional and strategic research. With the right balance of research, practice, and skills, you can minimize risks and prepare for success.


Hiring great designers is hard, so why make it harder?

Image of a piece of paper with a sad face on it
Image of a piece of paper with a sad face on it

Recruiters, hiring managers and design leaders: we all know that it’s hard to hire great designers. One surefire way to scare off great designers is to give them take-home exercises! There’s growing resistance against such exercises in the design community: in this article, I’ll dive into their ethical and practical concerns before sharing some helpful alternatives.

What’s wrong with take-home exercises?

They devalue designers’ time

As a designer, you have probably been asked to design a logo, website and/or wedding invitation for free before. Take-home exercises fall into the same category of practices that devalue designers’ time.

Let me draw a parallel: imagine that you’re looking for an accountant…


What is product design, and how can you get started?

I wrote this article for Not Only — But Also, a platform that connects young creatives with different roles in the industry.

When I tell people that I’m a Product Designer, some common responses I receive include:

So…what does that mean?

What kind of products do you design?

Do you design chairs?

Until recently, Product Design referred to industrial designers who worked with physical objects. Now, it has become the term of choice for digital companies seeking ‘full-stack’ designers with a range of digital skills. …

Meaghan Li

Product Designer, designing for social impact

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